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One of the most realistic features of NBA 2K16 is the new player animations

2KTV is an episodic weekly show where Rachel DeMita hosts some random NBA things and discusses happenings in the 2K world and in the overall NBA. NBA Today gives you a snap shot of all the real life games happening that day as well as letting you participate in online/offline games. MyTeam is where you build your own NBA team while collecting cards and buying packs, which is very addictive and easily one of the most frustrating modes to play. Who needs real basketball? The NBA season is already delayed, games have been canceled, and in all likelihood, we won't even get a season this year. To that, I say to hell with it all. Real basketball, dramatic as it can be, is filled to the brim with egotistical players, coaches, and owners who bicker endlessly about the direction of a league that can best be compared to the Titanic.
 
Top heavy with talent and encumbered with too many teams, the NBA as it currently exists feels more or less doomed, fated to crash into a David Stern-shaped iceberg the likes of which it cannot possibly recover. Even if it does come back this year, some big changes will have to happen to keep this boat afloat. Frankly, I think the league would be better off sinking, and dredged for salvage parts next year. No, there may not be an NBA season this year. But there is another installment of "NBA 2K," the top-rated basketball video game for 11 years running. Like in previous versions of the game, you start off by creating your player's physical attributes (height, weight, age, etc.). The game then assigns your abilities based off what type of player you want to be (perimeter shooter, post player, etc.). In theory, you could create a 7-foot point guard with zero post abilities, but I'm guessing the high dribble would make you susceptible to steals.

 
NBA 2K16 is like that person. If you can prepare yourself to endure frustration and disappointment - and find enjoyment in the finest basketball gaming to date when you do have the opportunity to - you need to pick up NBA 2K16 immediately. On the other hand, if those problems serve as a deal breaker for you, then you’ll want to skip this one until 2K Sports resolves the server problems. Which is not to say that NBA 2K is simple. Actually, it's a very difficult game to really master, and its tutorials don't go nearly far enough to really give you a handle on the advanced mechanics. There are videos, which are good enough for the basics, but they don't do much for nailing the timing on high-level moves. It also doesn't help that they are buried under a sub-menu, which is something you'll see a lot in NBA 2K. 
 
Although extra modes are nice, however, any sports game lives and dies with its technical gameplay and NBA 2K16 continues to deliver in that regard. In addition to solid physics and fluid player animations, the game also features some tweaks such as new shooting mechanics. For more realism, the game accounts for more factors besides timing and uses those to feed a new shot meter designed to reward smarter shooting. Players also get additional control via a diverse selection of passes as well as more dunk options when flying to the rim. NBA 2K16 is not NBA 2K15, and that's clear from the moment the game starts up. The standard boring main menu is gone, replaced by a more-engaging and colorful design that also provides a clear description of each mode, including MyGM, MyCareer, MyLeague, and MyTeam. Each mode is significantly different from the others, so there's plenty to explore.
 
Of course, one of the most realistic features of NBA 2K16 is the new player animations. In years past, the players had been somewhat rigid with their mannerisms. All big men behaved a certain way, and all guards did another. With the use of much more personalized animations for each player (especially superstars), 2K16 does a great job of making the players feel like their real-life counterpart. Personally, I don’t love the new system. While the meter removes the necessity of learning each player’s individual release, like it had been in the prior games, looking at the meter distracts the gamer from the artistic beauty of the new shooting strokes. Additionally, without having to understand how to read and time a player’s release, less skilled gamers have it significantly easier this time around.